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Upcoming Events

Event Date and Location Summary
Mark Griswold (CWRU Radiology) Thu. November 29th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Evelyn Hu (Harvard University) Thu. January 24th, 2019
4:00 pm-4:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

TBA

The 2018 Nobel Prizes in Science: What were they given for? Thu. January 31st, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Geoffrey Landis (NASA, Glenn) Thu. February 7th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Ken Singer (CWRU Physics) Thu. February 14th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

TBA

Raman Sundrum (University of Maryland) Thu. February 21st, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Michelle Soares-Santos (Brandeis University) Thu. February 28th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Cosmology in the era of multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves  Motivated by the exciting prospect of a new wealth of

No Colloquium. APS March Meeting. Thu. March 7th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
No Colloquium. Spring Break. Thu. March 14th, 2019
1:00 am-1:00 am
at Rockefeller 301
Subir Sachdev (Harvard University) Thu. March 21st, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Ira Rothstein (Carnegie Mellon University) Thu. March 28th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Matthew Fisher (KITP Santa Barbara) Thu. April 4th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Allan MacDonald (U Texas Austin) Thu. April 18th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Moiré pattern physics  in two-dimensional materials

Sinead Griffin (Lawrence Berkeley Lab) Thu. April 25th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Bharat Ratra (University of Kansas) Thu. September 5th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Spatial Curvature, Dark Energy Dynamics, Neither, or Both? Experiments and observations over the two last decades have persuaded cosmologists that

Past Events

Event Date Summary
Tracy Slatyer (MIT) Thu. November 15th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The Dark Side of Cosmic Dawn. Dark matter constitutes more than 5/6 of the matter in the universe, but its

Pino Strangi (CWRU Physics) Thu. November 8th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Plasmons at the Interface Between Physics and Cancer Nanotechnology: The Next Big Thing will be at the Nanoscale In recent

Federico Capasso (Harvard Univ) Thu. November 1st, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Flat Optics: from Metalenses to New Polarization Optics and New Routes to Vector Beam Generation  Arrays of optically thin, sub-wavelength

Mike Martens (CWRU Physics) Thu. October 25th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Conserving Helium: A story of MgB2 superconducting wire and MRI magnets The fabrication of MgB2 superconducting wire has enabled the

Georgia Karagiorgi (Columbia University) Thu. October 18th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The art of neutrino detection: What does it take, and why? Neutrinos are fundamental blocks of matter. As we’ve learned

Brian Keating (UC San Diego) Thu. October 11th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Fundamental Physics with the Simons Observatory The Simons Observatory is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built on Cerro

Tim Linden (Ohio State University) Thu. October 4th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

2018 Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecture 3: Colloquium  Indirect Searches for Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles Recent observations at gamma-ray and radio energies, as

Dan Hooper (Fermilab) Thu. September 27th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The WIMP is Dead. Long Live the WIMP!   Abstract: Although weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) have long been the

Charles Rosenblatt (CWRU Physics) Thu. September 20th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Manipulation of Topological Defects in Liquid Crystals  A topological defect (TD) occurs at a wall, line, or point where the

Laura Grego (Union of Concerned Scientists) Thu. September 13th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Missile Defense and Space Weapons Missile defenses and space weapons have been pursued at modest levels for many decades, but

Andre De Gouvea (Northwestern University) Thu. September 6th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The Brave nu World I review the current theoretical and phenomenological status of neutrino physics. I will discuss our current understanding

Laura Gladstone (CWRU Physics) Thu. April 26th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Report from the International Conference on Women in Physics: Reaching Towards Equity and Inclusion   In July 2017, I was

Jacob Scott (Cleveland Clinic) Thu. April 19th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Learning to perturb the evolutionary mechanisms driving drug resistance in cancer and microbes: an integrated theoretical and experimental approach. The

Dimitar Sasselov (Harvard University) Thu. April 12th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Ocean Worlds: from Familiar to Exotic and Extreme Planets   Water is a common molecule in the the galaxy and

Jesse Berezovsky (CWRU Physics) Thu. April 5th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The Broken Symmetry of Music: Applying Statistical Physics to Understand the Structure of Music The ubiquity of music throughout history and

TBA Thu. March 29th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Sebastian Deffner (Univ Maryland Baltimore County) Thu. March 22nd, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Quantum speed limits: from Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle to optimal quantum control One of the most widely known building blocks of

Spring Break Thu. March 15th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
APS March Meeting Thu. March 8th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Lindley Winslow (MIT) Thu. March 1st, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

First Results from CUORE:  Majorana Neutrinos and the Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay The neutrino is unique among the Standard

Ilya Gruzberg (Ohio State University) Thu. February 15th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Mysteries of the quantum Hall staircase Quantum Hall effects are a very rich subject in condensed matter physics with many

The 2017 Nobel Prizes: What were they given for? Thu. February 8th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Harsh Mathur (Physics) on the prize in Physics; Phoebe Stewart (Pharmacology) on the prize in Chemistry; Peter Harte (Genetics and

Peter Armitage (Johns Hopkins) Thu. January 18th, 2018
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

On Ising’s model of ferromagnetism The 1D Ising model is a classical model of great historical significance for both classical

Dragan Huterer (Univ Michigan) Thu. November 30th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

New Views of the Universe I will discuss how progress in cosmology over the past decade has improved our understanding of

A.H. Heuer (CWRU Materials Science and Engineering) Thu. November 16th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Mechanism of Aluminum-Oxide Scale Formation on some High-Temperature Structural Alloys The formation of Al2O3 scale on high-temperature structural alloys is

Xuan Gao (CWRU Physics) Thu. November 9th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

2D Materials: from Semiconductors to Topological Insulators Abstract: Since the first isolation of one-atom thick graphene, research on two-dimensional (2D) materials

Peter Lu (Harvard University) Thu. October 26th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Gelation of Particles with Short-ranged Attraction Nanoscale or colloidal particles are exceptionally important in many realms of science and technology.

Peter Lu (Harvard University) (Not a Colloquium but of related interest) Wed. October 25th, 2017
5:00 pm-6:00 pm

Lecture co-sponsored by the departments of Physics and Art History, the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, and the Cleveland Museum

Jason Alicea (Caltech) Thu. October 19th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Majorana Materializes  In 1937 Ettore Majorana introduced the concept of what are now fittingly called Majorana fermions — fermionic particles

No colloquium this week Thu. October 12th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Indu Satija (George Mason University) Thu. October 5th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Pure & Poetic: Butterfly in the Quantum World The Hofstadter butterfly is a fascinating two-dimensional spectral landscape – a graph

Idit Zehavi (CWRU, Astronomy) Thu. September 28th, 2017
4:00 pm-4:00 pm

Galaxy Clustering and the Galaxy-Halo Connection In the contemporary view of the Universe, galaxies form and evolve in dark matter

Jeremy Levy (Univ Pittsburgh) Thu. September 21st, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Correlated Nanoelectronics  The study of strongly correlated electronic systems and the development of quantum transport in nanoelectronic devices have followed

Liang Wu, UC Berkeley, MPPL3, Antiferromagnetic resonance and in-gap terahertz continuum in Kitaev Honeycomb magnet α−RuCl3 Fri. September 15th, 2017
12:45 pm-1:45 pm

Antiferromagnetic resonance and in-gap terahertz continuum in Kitaev Honeycone magnet α−RuCl3 Spin-1/2 moments in the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator α-RuCl3 are

Liang Wu (Berkeley); Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecture Thu. September 14th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Quantized electro-dynamical responses in topological materials Although solid-state systems are usually considered “dirty” with impurities and imperfections, it is still

Mike Tamor (Ford Research) Thu. September 7th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

History, Geometry and the Future of Mobility For over a century the personal automobile has served as a highly adaptable

Jun Zhu (Penn State) Thu. August 31st, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Quantum valley Hall kink states and valleytronics in bilayer graphene Conventional field effect transistors control current transmission by controlling the

Paul Butler (Carnegie Institute of Washington) Thu. April 27th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Planets Around Nearby Stars Modern science began with Copernicus speculating that the Earth is a planet and that all the

Juan de Pablo (University of Chicago) Thu. April 20th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Nanoparticles in liquid crystals, and liquid crystals in nanoparticles.   Liquid crystals are remarkably sensitive to interfacial interactions. Small perturbations

Lutz Schimansky-Geier (Humboldt University at Berlin) Thu. April 13th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Active Brownian particles: From individual to collective behavior Single self-propelled particles as well as ensembles of self-propelled particles are examples

Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse) Thu. April 6th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Active Matter: from colloids to living cells Collections of self-propelled entities, from living cells to engineered microswimmers, organize in a

Michael Weiss (CWRU Biochemistry) Thu. March 30th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Origins, Evolution and Biophysics: an Ephemeral Golden Braid Douglas Hofstradter’s celebrated 1979 book, Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid (“GEB”),

Mark Wise (Caltech) Note non-standard time Thu. March 23rd, 2017
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Dark Matter Bound States and Indirect Dark Matter Signals Most of the mass density in our universe is not composed

Herbert Levine (Rice Bioengineering) Thu. March 9th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Can theoretical physics help cancer biology? The case of metastatic spread In order to spread from the primary tumor to

Glenn Starkman (Physics) Thu. March 2nd, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

An Uncooperative Universe: Large Scale Anomalies in the CMB The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is our most important source of information about

Corbin Covault (CWRU) Thu. February 23rd, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

A Cosmic Ray Astrophysicist’s Approach to the Optical Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence   For decades scientists have been searching

Thu. February 16th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
The 2016 Science Nobel Prizes – What were they given for? Thu. February 9th, 2017
4:00 pm-4:00 pm

Harsh Mathur on the prize in Physics; Michael Hinczewski on the prize in Chemistry; and Alan Tartakoff on the prize

Thu. February 2nd, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Lucile Savary (MIT) – Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecture Thu. January 26th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Quantum Spin Liquids The search for truly quantum phases of matter is one of the center pieces of modern research

Kathy Kash (CWRU Physics) Thu. January 19th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Nitride Semiconductors: Beyond the Binaries The binary nitride semiconductors and their alloys have led to transformations in both lighting and

Pavel Fileviez Perez (CWRU Physics) Thu. December 8th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

New Physics and Unification of Forces The unification of fundamental forces in nature is one of the most appealing ideas for

Mike Hinczewski (CWRU Physics) Thu. December 1st, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
Robert Owen (Oberlin College) Thu. November 17th, 2016
4:00 pm-4:00 pm

Numerical Relativity and Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Hole Mergers In September of 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) made

Marija Drndic (University of Pennsylvania) Thu. November 10th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

2D Materials Nanosculpting and Bioelectronics Applications Electron beams constitute powerful tools to shape materials with atomic resolution inside a transmission

Tao Han (University of Pittsburgh) Thu. November 3rd, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Physics Motivations for Future Colliders With the milestone discovery of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC, high energy physics

Andrew Rappe (University of Pennsylvania) Thu. October 27th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Slush Structure and Dynamics in a Relaxor Ferroelectric Ferroelectric materials undergo solid-solid structural phase transitions between phases with aligned dipoles

Jim Van Orman (CWRU EEES) Thu. October 20th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Simulating Planetary Interiors in the Lab This talk will provide an overview of experimental studies on the properties of planetary

Mark Newman (University of Michigan) Thu. October 13th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Paul Erdos, Kevin Bacon, and the Six Degrees of Separation: The Statistical Physics of Networks There are networks in every

John Monnier (University of Michigan) Thu. September 29th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Imaging the Surfaces of Stars Under even the best atmospheric conditions, telescope diffraction fundamentally limits the angular resolution for astronomical

Kurt Hinterbichler (CWRU Physics) Thu. September 22nd, 2016
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Massive Gravitons, the Cosmological Constant and New Directions in Gravity The solution to the cosmological constant problem may involve modifying

Director: Peter Galison (Harvard). Movie. Note unusual end time. Thu. September 15th, 2016
4:00 pm-5:30 pm

Containment Abstract Can we contain some of the deadliest and most long-lasting substances ever produced? Left over from the Cold

Richard Schaller (Northwestern University). Not a physics colloquium but of potential interest to physicists. Note unusual location and time. Thu. September 8th, 2016
4:00 pm-6:00 pm

Chemistry Colloquium: Electronic and Thermal Interconversion and Migration in Energy-Relevant Materials In order to produce energy efficient devices, thorough understanding of

Of Bodies Changed to New Forms – Tim Atherton Thu. April 21st, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Soft matter is a broad class of materials with many examples found in everyday life: foods, crude oil, many biological

Resonant Tunneling in a Dissipative Environment: Quantum Critical Behavior – Harold Baranger Thu. April 14th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The role of the surroundings, or environment, in quantum mechanics has long captivated physicists’ attention. Recently, quantum phase transitions (QPT)–

Can Charge Qubits Compete with Spin Qubits for Quantum Information Processing? – HongWen Jiang Thu. April 7th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

onductor quantum dots (QDs) are a leading approach for the implementation of solid-state based qubits. In principle, either charge or

Controlling Coherent Spins at the Nanoscale: Prospects for Practical Spin-Based Technology – Jesse Berezovsky Thu. March 31st, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Despite living in a complex, room temperature, solid-state environment, the spin of electrons bound to a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in

Photophysics of Organic Materials: From Thin-Film Devices to Single Molecules and from Optoelectronics to Entomology – Oksana Ostroverkhova Thu. March 24th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Organic (opto)electronic materials have been explored in a variety of applications in electronics and photonics. They offer several advantages over

Gravitational Waves Discovered: The Recent Detection of an Ancient Binary Black Hole Merger – Leslie E. Wade Thu. March 3rd, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

On September 14, 2015 the two ground-based interferometers that comprise the LIGO network directly observed the gravitational-wave signature of a

Non-Linear Optics of Ultrastrongly Coupled Cavity Polaritons – Mike Crescimanno Thu. February 18th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recent experiments at CWRU (Singer) have developed organic cavity polaritons that display world-record vacuum Rabi splittings of more than an

Albert Michelson, the Michelson-Morley experiment, and the dichotomy between megaprojects and table-top science – Philip Taylor Thu. February 11th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

During the past 130 years the range of sizes and costs for scientific apparatus has expanded enormously. While some groundbreaking

A New Twist on Electromagnetism for Energy Conversion – Stephen Rand Thu. February 4th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In electromagnetism effects of the magnetic field are generally ignored. However in recent optical experiments intense magnetic light scattering has

The 2015 Science Nobel Prizes – What were they given for? – Kurt Runge (Chemistry), Jim Kazura (Physiology or Medecine), Andrew Tolley (Physics) Thu. January 28th, 2016
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Gravitational wave detection with precision interferometry – Nergis Malvalvala (unofficial colloquium) Fri. November 20th, 2015
10:15 am-11:15 am

Laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors are poised to launch a new era of gravitational wave astronomy and unprecedented tests of

Remote entanglement in superconducting quantum information – Michael Hatridge Thu. November 12th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I’ll review material from the technical lectures and discuss the difference between entanglement via local and ‘remote’ interactions. I’ll discuss

Intracellular Pressure Dynamics in Cells – Wanda Strychalski Thu. November 5th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Cell migration plays an essential role in many important biological processes such as wound healing, cancer metastasis, embryonic development, and

Enabling High Performance Computational Physics with Community Libraries – Matt Knepley Thu. October 29th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will speak about the PETSc library, a community effort that I help lead, which provides scalable parallel linear and

Quantum Chromodynamics at Five Trillion Degrees Kelvin – Michael Strickland Thu. October 22nd, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Relativistic heavy ion collision experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at CERN have made it possible to turn back the

In honor of Ben Segall’s 90th birthday – Arnold Dahm, Philip Taylor, Walter Lambrecht Thu. October 15th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Following brief reminiscences by Arnie Dahm and Phil Taylor, Walter Lambrecht will review some of Ben Segall’s early papers on

The Conformal Bootstrap: From Magnets to Boiling Water – David Simmons-Duffin Thu. October 1st, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Conformal Field Theory (CFT) describes the long-distance dynamics of numerous quantum and statistical many-body systems. The long-distance limit of a

Who and where is the graviton? – Claudia de Rham Thu. September 24th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One hundred years after “Die Feldgleichungen der Gravitation” by Albert Einstein (The Fields Equations of Gravitation) and perhaps at the

The Science of Climate Change and the Changing Climate of Science – Philip Taylor Thu. September 10th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Isn’t science supposed to be a field of study in which everybody eventually agrees on what is correct and what

Cosmology with Planck’s Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background – Brendan Crill Thu. May 7th, 2015
2:15 pm-3:15 pm

The Planck satellite was launched in 2009 and mapped the full sky in nine bands from 30 to 857 GHz,

One century of neutrino mass experiments: from radium salts to microwaves – Benjamin Monreal Mon. April 27th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The neutrino mass is one of the longest-standing unanswered questions in particle physics. We’ve recently learned a tremendous amount about

A career in clean energy – Philip Farese Thu. April 23rd, 2015
11:30 am-12:30 pm
Novel measurement methods for probing magnetic nanoparticles – Yumi Ijiri Thu. April 16th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Magnetic nanoparticles are the focus of much current research with uses ranging from data storage in hard drives to targeted

Stochasticity in ecological dynamics – Karen Abbott Thu. April 9th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Population dynamics result from a combination of deterministic mechanisms (e.g. competition, predation) that drive nonlinear dynamics and stochastic forces that

Music, Sweet and Sour – David Farrell Thu. April 2nd, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Although the perceptual phenomena of consonance and dissonance in music have attracted interest across a wide variety of disciplines for

Multiscale Self-organization of Emulsion Droplets – Jasna Brujic Thu. March 26th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Self-assembly of inanimate objects into well-defined 3D structures, such as folded proteins or DNA-origami, remains a mystery. Inspired by biological

Interacting particle models and phase transitions for social particles – Alethea Barbaro Thu. March 19th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Opportunities and Challenges for Extreme Optics – Nader Engheta Thu. February 26th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recent developments in condensed matter physics and nanoscience have made it possible to tailor materials with unusual parameters and characteristics.

Chemistry in Art, Art in Chemistry, and the Spiritual Ground They Share – Roald Hoffmann Thu. February 12th, 2015
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

After looking at the evolution of pigments for the color blue, Roald Hoffman, Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters

Teaching old materials new tricks: Making organic semiconductors crystallize on demand and metals emit light – Barry Rand Thu. February 5th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this seminar, we will focus on two aspects of our work that look at materials which have been studied

The 2014 Science Nobel Prizes – What were they given for? – Daniel Wesson from Neuroscience will give the Medicine or Physiology talk, Walter Lambrecht will give the Physics talk, and Andrew Rollins from Biomedical Engineering will give the Chemistry talk. Thu. January 29th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Physics: This year’s Nobel prize in Physics went to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura for their groundbreaking work

Physics of the Piano – Nicholas Giordano Thu. January 22nd, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Why des a piano sound like a piano? A similar question can be asked of virtually all musical instruments. A

Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations – Jeff Gore Thu. January 15th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Natural populations can suffer catastrophic collapse in response to small changes in environmental conditions as a result of a bifurcation

Spotting Majorana Fermions amidst Hofstadter butterflies and disordered landscapes – Smita Vishveshwara Thu. November 20th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In the hunt for Majorana particles, originally proposed in the context of particle physics, recent investigations have led to exciting

Neutrino Oscillations at Work – Jenny Thomas Thu. November 6th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The observation that the three types of neutrino flavor oscillate among themselves led to the realisation that neutrinos have a

Physics and Language – Harsh Mathur Thu. October 30th, 2014
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

What Can We Learn about Language by Reading Millions of Books? (A Baker-Nord Digital Humanities Event) The dramatic growth of

Constraining supersymmetry using molecules – Amar Vutha Thu. October 16th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Supersymmetry, and other theories that go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, often predict the existence of new particles

Halide perovskites: their unusual combination of properties and its impact on solar cell applications – Walter Lambrecht Thu. October 9th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Hybrid organic/inorganic halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide, (MA)PbI3, have recently burst on the solar cell scene with record

The Standard Model and Beyond with Ultracold Neutrons – Leah Broussard Thu. September 25th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) provide an excellent laboratory for precision studies of the Standard Model of particle physics, and can be

Quantum Mechanics Without Measurements – Robert Griffiths Thu. September 18th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In standard (textbook) quantum mechanics, “measurement” provides an essential link between the formalism and its physical interpretation, but physical measurements

The black hole information paradox and its resolution in string theory – Samir Mathur Thu. September 11th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Some 40 years ago Hawking found a remarkable contradiction: if we accept the standard behavior of gravity in regions of low

Building Nuclear Bombs in Your Basement: the technology of nuclear proliferation – R. Scott Kemp Thu. September 4th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Technology has been long understood to play a central role in limiting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Over the last thirty

Getting research news out: connecting with the press and DIY communication – Kate McAlpine Thu. August 28th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Although fewer daily papers keep reporters on the science beat, science reporting is still thriving online, from large news organizations to

Our MRI Startup Grows Up: QED and HealthCare in 2014 – Hiroyuki Fujita Thu. April 24th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Dr. Fujita’s talk will focus on his MRI company and give a “State of QED” address, and how its accomplishments

Chasing Inflation – John Ruhl Thu. April 17th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has provided one of our most robust and powerful tools for learning about the contents

Super-Resolution Microscopies at the Frontiers of Cell Biology (co-sponsored by the Institute for the Science of Origins) – Bill Dougherty Thu. April 10th, 2014
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The ultimate resolution of an image acquired by an optical system (a telescope or microscope) is governed by the laws

Results from the LUX dark matter search, and prospects for the future – Tom Shutt Thu. April 3rd, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Arrested Development (of Emulsions) – Tim Atherton Thu. March 27th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Emulsions – dispersions of “guest” fluid droplets inside another “host” fluid – are very familiar in everyday life as food,

Nanoscale thermal transport – Alexis Abramson Thu. March 20th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nanofibers and graphene have gained great attention over the past two decades. Owing to their

Curvature and defects in liquid crystals and other soft materials: Differential geometry isn’t just for cosmology any more! – Jonathan Selinger Thu. February 27th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Liquid-crystal membranes have a coupling between curvature and orientational order: Defects in the orientational order can induce curvature, and conversely,

The Hunt for the Missing Components of the Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy . . . . and Women in Physics. – Evalyn Gates Thu. February 20th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In spite of much discussion and a variety of efforts aimed at increasing the number of women in physics, the entry

Mercury’s interior: New views from MESSENGER – Steven Hauck Thu. February 6th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

More than 35 years after Mariner 10 made its third and final flyby of the planet Mercury MESSENGER (short for MErcury,

The 2013 Science Nobel Prizes – What were they given for? – Martin Snider, Michael Weiss, Glenn Starkman Thu. January 30th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Dr. Martin Snider (Biochemistry) on the prize for Medicine or Physiology Dr. Michael Weiss (Biochemistry)on the prize for Chemistry Dr.

Next Steps in Neutrino Physics – Geralyn Zeller Thu. January 23rd, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe, yet there is a surprising amount of information we still

The Physics of Climate Change – Michael Mann Thu. January 16th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will review the basic scientific fundamentals behind human-caused climate change, including a discussion of physics-based theoretical climate models. I

In proximity to novel physics: Topological Insulators coupled to Superconductors – Nadya Mason Thu. December 5th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Topological insulators (TI’s) are materials that are insulators in their interiors, but have unique conducting states on their surfaces. They

Fukushima: Implications for the Understanding of Severe Accidents and the Future of Nuclear Energy – M.V. Ramana Thu. November 21st, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Like the earlier nuclear accidents at Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986), the multiple accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi

Magnetism Without Magnetic Atoms: The Physics of the Vacancy Center in Graphene – Sashi Satpathy Thu. November 14th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Graphene is a material of considerable current interest owing to its linear band structure and excitations that behave as massless

To Superconduct or Not to Superconduct; That is the Question – Michelson Postdoctoral Prizewinner Wei-Cheng Lee Thu. November 7th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Superconductor, a material losing resistivity below a critical temperature Tc, remains one of the grand challenges in physics. This field

Graphene at the Boundaries – Paul McEuen Thu. October 31st, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

With its remarkable structural, thermal, mechanical, optical, and electronic properties, graphene is a true interdisciplinary material. In this talk we

The Cosmic Gravitational Wave Background – Tom Giblin Thu. October 24th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

As we prepare for news from the Laser-Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) theoretical and computational physics are crawling over each

Dark Materials: the Topology of Insulators – Harsh Mathur Thu. October 17th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Topological insulators are insulating materials with conducting surfaces. In this talk I will introduce topology by its application to the

Isostatic Lattice: From Jamming to Topological Surface Phonons – Tom Lubensky Thu. October 10th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Frames consisting of nodes connected pairwise by rigid rods or central-force springs, possibly with preferred relative angles controlled by bending

Modeling and simulating cellular processes in the brain: a mathematical challenge – Daniela Calvetti Thu. October 3rd, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Abstract: Understanding human brain is one of the greatest challenges of science, not the least because, almost by definition, it

Michelson and Morley –the men, the experiment, and the 1987 Centennial Celebration – Various + P. Taylor Thu. September 26th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Michelson-Morley experiment is arguably the most important measurement ever performed in the history of science. If its result had

Green commercial buildings: are they saving energy or are they just making us feel good? – John Scofield Thu. September 19th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

US buildings consume roughly 40% of the nation’s primary energy and are responsible for a similar fraction of our greenhouse

To wet or not to wet? That is the Question – Milton Cole Thu. September 12th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

If one looks at a leaf of a plant after a rainfall, one sees water droplets of varying sizes. What

Light or Dark? Mass and Gravity in the Universe – Stacy McGaugh Thu. September 5th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We now have a well developed cosmological paradigm, LCDM, in which most of the mass-energy is composed of unknown dark

“Look to the Stars” – an episode starring Case’s first Physics Professor – Albert A. Michelson Thu. August 29th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The semester’s first colloquium will be somewhat out of the ordinary – a screening of an old TV episode. The

Some Experiences Gained in Starting and Growing Optical Companies – James C. Wyant Thu. April 18th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

This talk will describe some experiences gained in starting and growing two optical companies, WYKO Corporation (1984-1997) and 4D Technology

Origin of rigidity in granular solids – Bulbul Chakraborty Thu. April 11th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Granular materials such as sand or rice grains behave in ways that are often counterintuitive. An example is “footprints on

The discovery of a new particle. Is it the Higgs? – Daniela Bortoletto Thu. April 4th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

On July 4th 2012 physicists working at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s highest-energy proton accelerator, at CERN in

Random laser, bio-inspired laser, and time-reversed laser – Hui Cao Thu. March 28th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this talk, I will review our studies of photonic nanostructures of random morphology. First, I show how we can

Hamiltonian Theory of Fractional Chern Bands – R. Shankar Thu. March 7th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

It has been known for some time that a system with a filled band will have an integer quantum Hall

Molecular interactions: linking physics and biology – Yi-Kuo Yu Thu. February 28th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Molecular interactions determine, for example, how transcription factors recognize their DNA binding sites, how proteins interact with each other, and

Many Worlds, the Born Rule, and Self-Locating Uncertainty – Sean Carroll Thu. February 21st, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A longstanding issue in attempts to understand the Everett (Many-Worlds) approach to quantum mechanics is the origin of the Born

Electrostatic charging of flowing granular materials – Dan Lacks Thu. February 14th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Contact charging occurs when two materials are brought into contact and then are separated. As a result of the contact,

The 2012 Science Nobel Prizes – What were they given for? – George Dubyak (Physiology and Biophysics), Paul Tesar (Genetics), Harsh Mathur (Physics) Thu. February 7th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Three 15-minute talks on the 2012 Nobel prizewinners and their work. The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics: Making Gedanken Experiments Real.

Unifying theory for universal quake statistics: from compressed nanopillars to earthquakes – Karin Dahmen Thu. January 31st, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The deformation of many solid and granular materials is not continuous, but discrete, with intermittent slips similar to earthquakes. Here,

The Two-Envelope Paradox – Edwin Meyer Thu. January 24th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One of the most puzzling paradoxes in philosophy, mathematics and finance is the two-envelope paradox (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_envelopes_problem). It is many years old,

Unparticles in Strongly Correlated Electron Matter – Philip Phillips Thu. January 17th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Several years ago, Howard Georgi introduced the concept of unparticles. Unparticle stuff has no particular mass. In fact, the mass

Unveiling the Mystery of Mass – Christoph Paus Thu. December 6th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One of the prime reasons the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was built is to resolve the question how particles acquire

Statics and Dynamics of Colloidal Particles in Liquid Crystals – Oleg Lavrentovich Thu. November 29th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Colloids and liquid crystals are two important classes of soft matter, usually explored independently of each other. The most studied

Nuclear Q & A – William Fickinger Thu. November 15th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

This talk addresses key questions associated with nuclear energy and weapons technologies and their impact on society. The intended audience

Electro-active polymers and high-power-density energy storage – Jerry Bernholc Thu. November 8th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The usual means of storing electrical energy are either batteries, where the current induces chemical reactions, or capacitors, where especially

Biosensing with Magnetic Nanoparticles – John Weaver Thu. November 1st, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In Biology, many tools exist to study individual cells in culture but there is a paucity of tools to study

The First Quasars in Cosmic Structure Formation – Tiziana DiMatteo Thu. October 25th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

As we are just attempting to understand how galaxy formation is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes, one

Beyond graphene: band insulators and topological insulators – Kin Fai Mak Thu. October 18th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Beyond graphene there exist a rich family of two-dimensional crystals with a broad spectrum of electronic properties, which remain largely

Gamma-ray Pulsars with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [joint with Astronomy] – David J. Thompson Thu. October 11th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Pulsars, which are rapidly rotating magnetized neutron stars, are natural laboratories for physics under extreme conditions. Gamma radiation has now

Decades of Achievement — a tribute to nine of our number having birthdays ending in a zero – Various Thu. October 4th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Three physics faculty have their 50th birthday this year, three have their 60th, and three their 80th. We celebrate their

“How we fixed the Hubble Space Telescope” – James Breckinridge Thu. September 27th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Gate Controlled Spin-Orbit Interaction and 1D Thermoelectric Transport in InAs Nanowires – Xuan Gao Thu. September 13th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

InAs nanowires provide an interesting nanomaterial platform for spintronic device and thermoelectric energy conversion applications, owing to their strong quantum

The Intersection between Science and Politics: How Science is Used and Abused in Congress – Chris Martin Thu. September 6th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

After spending a year working as a staffer in the US Senate’s Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, Dr. Chris Martin

Development of the II-IV Nitride Semiconductors; Considerations from Science, Technology and Sociology – Kathy Kash Thu. August 30th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Ever since the profound effect of the invention of the transistor in 1947, the impact of inorganic semiconductors on our

Smectics! – Randall Kamien Thu. April 26th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The homotopy theory of topological defects in ordered media fails to completely characterize systems with broken translational symmetry. I will

Combining superconductors and ferromagnets: a new type of symmetry? – Norman Birge Thu. April 19th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Physicists are constantly on the lookout for new symmetries in the ground states of quantum systems. Familiar examples include ferromagnets,

Stars, galaxies and cosmology in the nearby Universe [joint with Astronomy] – Alan McConnachie Thu. April 12th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The basic tenets of the prevailing cosmological paradigm – Lambda-Cold Dark Matter – are generally well understood and robust to

Lasers and Anti-lasers – A. Douglas Stone Thu. April 5th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A laser is an optical device that transforms incoherent input energy (the pump), into coherent outgoing radiation in a specific

The Life and Death of a Drop: Topological Transitions and Singularities – Sidney Nagel Thu. March 29th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Because fluids flow and readily change their shape in response to small forces, they are often used to model phenomena

Multilayer Polymer Photonics: From “Origami” Lasers to Optical Data Storage to Cavity Polaritons – Ken Singer Thu. March 22nd, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The National Science Foundation Center for Layered Polymer Systems (CLiPS), in its sixth year at CWRU, is focused on a

The Red Revolution: How Seismology of Red Giants is Transforming Stellar Physics and Stellar Population Studies [joint with Astronomy] – Marc Pinsonneault Thu. March 8th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Space missions have uncovered a rich, and high amplitude, pulsation spectrum in red giant stars. The information encoded in the

Pollockian Mechanics: Painting with Viscous Jets – Andrzej Herczyński Thu. February 23rd, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Beginning around 1945, an American Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock invented and perfected a new artistic technique based on pouring

Viscosity of Strongly Interacting Fermions – Mohit Randeria Thu. February 16th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The viscosity of strongly interacting quantum fluids has recently been examined in diverse areas of physics – black holes and

The 2011 Science Nobel Prizes – What were they given for? – Glenn Starkman, Arthur Heuer, and Mansun Sy Thu. February 9th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

GLENN STARKMAN (Dept. of Physics) will present on the Nobel Prize in Physics: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was

Oriented assembly of microparticles by capillarity – Kate Stebe Thu. February 2nd, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Particles with well defined shapes can be directed to assemble into complex structures by capillarity. Here we explore two themes.

Higgs Boson – on the road to discovery – Sergo Jindariani Thu. January 26th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Higgs boson is an important piece of the Standard Model of particle physics that has yet to be experimentally

Fundamental Physics from Large-Scale Structure – Dragan Huterer Thu. January 19th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A little more than a decade after the discovery of the accelerating universe, the nature of dark energy remains one

Can that really be so? A light-hearted look at the concept of force in classical, quantum, and statistical mechanics – Philip Taylor Thu. December 8th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Some folk think that there are four types of force. Napoleon thought there were two. I am going to talk about

Closing In On Dark Matter – Dan Hooper Thu. November 17th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A variety of direct and indirect searches for dark matter are currently underway, a number of which have even reported

Computational Thermodynamics: First Principles Prediction of Crystal Structures and Alloy Phase Diagrams – Michael Widom Thu. November 3rd, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

As Feynman noted, rules of chemistry are determined “in principle” by physics, but just as knowing the rules of chess

Development of a magnetic-resonance-imaging-guided radiation-therapy device to treat cancer patients – James Dempsey Thu. October 20th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Nearly two-thirds of all cancer patients in the U.S. receive radiation therapy to treat their illness. Many advanced technologies have

Electronic liquid crystal correlations in the pseudogap phase of high Tc cuprates – Michael Lawler Thu. October 13th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The pseudogap phase of cuprate oxides is one of the most perplexing phases in condensed matter physics; it is a

Temperature-accelerated dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of thin-film growth – Jacques Amar Thu. September 29th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Thin-films are used in a variety of applications ranging from semiconductor technology to industrial coatings, sensors, and photovoltaic devices. In

Culturomics: Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books – Erez Liebermann-Aiden Thu. September 22nd, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4 per cent of all books ever printed. Analysis of this

Almost Quantum Mechanics – Benjamin Schumacher Thu. September 15th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

To understand how quantum mechanics works, it is useful to imagine alternative “foil” theories that work differently. Modal quantum theory

Fukushima and the Future of Nuclear Energy in the U.S. – Richard Denning Thu. September 8th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Dr. Denning will describe what actually happened in the Fukushima accident and provide an evaluation of the failure in safety

Why are there so many interpretations of quantum mechanics? – Pierre Hohenberg Thu. September 1st, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The foundations of quantum mechanics have been plagued by controversy throughout the 85 year history of the field. It is

“It’s Chooz Time Folks!” – Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecturer Lindley Winslow, Wed. May 4th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The last decade has seen a revolution in our understanding of the tiniest fundamental particle, the neutrino. The results of

Exploring the Energy (and Lifetime) Frontiers with the CMS Experiment – Christopher Hill Thu. April 21st, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In November 2010, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN completed its first physics run of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)

Financial Mathematics for Physicists – Bryan Lynn Thu. April 14th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty – Rob Nelson Thu. April 7th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will review the technical history of nuclear weapons, the U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms race and efforts to control the spread

Black Holes and Thermodynamics – Jennie Traschen Thu. March 31st, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In 1971 Hawking published the Area Theorem, which shows that the area of a black hole either increases or stays

Dark Energy: constant or time variable? (… and other open questions) – Bharat Ratra Thu. March 17th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Experiments and observations over the last decade have persuaded cosmologists that (as yet undetected) dark energy is by far the

The 2010 Nobel (Sciences) Prize-fest – Tim Atherton, Yanming Wang, and Paul Tesar Thu. March 3rd, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Three 15-minute talks on the 2010 Nobel prizewinners and their work

The New World of Gamma Ray Astronomy – Lucy Fortson Thu. February 24th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

With the third generation ground-based gamma-ray telescopes delivering over a hundred new TeV emitting objects and with the new Fermi

From Lasing in Soft-Composite Materials to Optical Transparency in Metamaterials – Giuseppe Strangi Mon. February 21st, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Lasing materials range from periodic systems such as photonic crystals to partially ordered and disordered dielectric materials that scatter light

The Persistent Mystery of the Highest Energy Cosmic Ray – Corbin Covault Thu. February 17th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One of the longest-standing mysteries of fundamental astrophysics is the origin and nature of the highest energy cosmic rays. These

Two packing problems – Narayanan Menon Thu. February 10th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will discuss progress in two ongoing sets of experiments on the packing of macroscopic objects. The first of these

Pi-conjugated organic materials: properties, applications and the importance of interfaces – Mats Fahlman Thu. February 3rd, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Electronics applications such as light emitting devices for lighting and flat panel displays, transistors, solar cells and sensors based on

A Biophysical Perspective of Understanding Nanoparticles at Large – Pu-Chun Ke Thu. January 27th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this talk I will present a biophysical perspective that describes the fate of nanoparticles in both the aqueous phase

Advanced Materials Stabilized by Interfacial Particles – Paul S. Clegg Thu. January 20th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Emulsions, typically droplets of oil in water, are widely used in, e.g. cosmetics, paints, foods and polymer synthesis. The surface

Aggregating Dyes and Chromonic Liquid Crystals – Peter Collings Thu. January 13th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Chromonic liquid crystals form when molecules aggregate into anisotropic shapes at high enough density to promote orientational order. There is

Smart Polymeric Materials: From Fundamental Science to New Technologies – Mark G. Kuzyk Wed. January 12th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Dye doped polymers, which were originally designed for nonlinear-optical applications, combine the good optical quality and processabilty of the host

Cosmology with the South Pole Telescope – John Ruhl Thu. December 2nd, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The South Pole Telescope is dedicated to mapping several thousand square degrees of the southern sky at millimeter wavelengths. Four

Electroweak stars: Electroweak Matter Destruction as an Exotic Stellar Engine – Dejan Stokovic Thu. November 18th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Stellar evolution from a protostar to neutron star is of one of the best studied subjects in modern astrophysics. Yet,

Rethinking MR: Collecting information instead of images – Mark Griswold Thu. November 11th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides exquisite depiction of anatomy and function without the ionizing radiation found in e.g. CT or

The quest for dilute ferromagnetism in semiconductors: Guides and misguides by theory – Stephan Lany Thu. November 4th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Semiconductivity (SC) and ferromagnetism (FM) are an unlikely couple, each having quite different desires in regard of the electronic band

Heterovalent ternary compounds, a new form of semiconductor property engineering: from electronic energy bands to lattice dynamics – Walter Lambrecht Thu. October 28th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Over the last five years or so, my group has studied the properties of a new family of nitride semiconductors,

Strands of Superconductivity at the Nanoscale – Paul Goldbart Thu. October 21st, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Superconducting circuitry can now be fabricated at the nanoscale, e.g., by depositing suitable materials on to single molecules, such as

From quantum mechanics to radiology to business, starting with the basic physics of vascular imaging – Mark Haacke Thu. October 14th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

TBA

Morphology and dynamics of polymers at interfaces – Mesfin Tsige Thu. September 30th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The surface and interfacial properties of polymers play a key role in many technological applications ranging from telecommunication to biotechnology.

High-efficiency thermoelectric materials: new design strategies, new applications – Joseph Heremans Thu. September 23rd, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Thermoelectric energy converters are solid state devices that convert thermal to electrical energy, and are used in heat pumps and

Spin torque effects in magnetic tunnel junctions – Olle Heinonen Thu. September 9th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The prediction by Slonczewski and Berger that currents in magnetic heterostructures can exert a torque on the magnetization in the

Cavity Control in a Single-Electron Quantum Cyclotron: An Improved Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment – David Hanneke Thu. May 13th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Measurements of the electron magnetic moment (the “g-value”) probe the electron’s interaction with the fluctuating vacuum. With a quantum electrodynamics

William Herschel and the Invention of Modern Astronomy – Michael D. Lemonick Thu. May 6th, 2010
2:00 pm-3:00 pm

In 1781, William Herschel became the first person in human history to discover a new planet. This feat was enough

Understanding and predicting material properties: insight from quantum simulations – Giulia Galli Thu. April 29th, 2010
11:00 am-12:00 pm

We discuss the progress and successes obtained in recent years in predicting fundamental properties of systems in condensed phases and

Organic Spintronics – Valy Vardeny Thu. April 22nd, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Organic semiconductors have been used as active layer in devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, field-effect transistors,

Water on the Surface of the Moon – Jessica Sunshine (jointly with Astronomy) Thu. April 15th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Although the Moon was widely thought to be anhydrous, OH and H2O absorptions were detected on the lunar surface by

Deterministic Isoeffective Dose – Proposal for a New Unit – The Barendsen (Bd) – Barry Wessels, Thu. April 8th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
2=1: The Gentle Art of Lying Thu. April 1st, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Even talented students struggle with fundamental concepts in mathematics and physics. They cannot reason with graphs and have no feel

The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time – Sean Carroll Thu. March 25th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Over a century ago, Boltzmann and others provided a microscopic understanding for the tendency of entropy to increase. But this

The Demographics of Exoplanets – Scott Gaudi Thu. March 4th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The physical processes that govern planet formation, migration, and evolution are imprinted on the orbital element and mass distributions of

From the Bottom Up: Self-Assembled One-Dimension Soft Materials – Jiyu Fang Mon. March 1st, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Molecular self-assembly mediated by noncovalent bonds is becoming increasingly popular as a “bottom up” approach in forming nano- and meso-scale

Dynamical Imaging using Spatial Nonlinearity – Jason W. Fleischer Thu. February 25th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

It is well known that one cannot image directly through a nonlinear medium, as intensity-dependent phase changes distort signals as

Structural relaxations beyond the colloidal glass transition – Veronique Trappe Mon. February 15th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Colloidal dispersions consist of small particles that are immersed in a molecular fluid. The particles move by diffusion, driven by

Photonics with Organic-Inorganic Nanostructures – Manfred Eich Mon. February 8th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The presentation will outline the physics of photonic crystals and photonic nanowires employing silicon and organic materials. Dispersion properties and

On a Few Challenges in Soft Condensed Matter Physics – Igor Sokolov Thu. February 4th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Soft Condensed Matter (SCM) is a broad area of science, which includes studying liquids, colloids, gels, polymers, foams, biomaterials, etc.

Effects of osmotic stress on DNA packing and capsid stability in simple viruses – Rudi Podgornik Thu. January 21st, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will address the problem of DNA packing in the bacteriophage capsid. I will show that it can be formulated

The 2009 Nobel (Sciences) Prize-fest – Kathy Kash, William Merrick, Ken Singer, and Derek Taylor Thu. January 14th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Come hear about the Nobel prizes in Chemistry, Medicine or Physiology, and Physics from local experts.

Dynamical Processes in Extrasolar Planetary Systems – Fred Adams Thu. December 3rd, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Over the past decade, observations have sparked a renaissance of planetary studies, with nearly 400 planets discovered in orbit about

Probing electrons in a flatland: optical spectroscopy of graphene – Jie Shan Thu. November 19th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Graphene, a single atomic layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, has been the subject of intense scientific interest recently. Many of

The Uncanny Physics of Superhero Comic Books – James Kakalios Thu. November 12th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

While it is not quite true that one can learn physics from superhero comic books, it is the motivation for

Neutrino Physics Beyond SNO – Mark Chen Thu. November 5th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A follow-up experiment to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is being developed, called SNO+. With a liquid scintillator replacing the heavy

Close Encounters with the Quantum Berry Phase – Hari Manoharan Thu. October 29th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

If we deform a material and restore it precisely back to its starting point, our everyday intuition tells us that

Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope: The First Year – Peter Michelson Thu. October 22nd, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has completed its first year of observations. The two instruments on Fermi cover more than

Weighing the Universe – Neta Bahcall Thu. October 15th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

How do we weigh the Universe? Where is the Dark Matter? I will discuss these questions and show that several

How RNA helicases unwind – Eckhard Jankowsky Thu. October 8th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Virtually all aspects of RNA metabolism involve RNA helicases, enzymes that remodel RNA and RNA-protein complexes in an ATP-dependent fashion.

Combining computation and experiment to accelerate the discovery of new hydrogen storage materials – Donald J. Siegel Thu. October 1st, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The potential of emerging technologies such as fuel cells (FCs) and photovoltaics for environmentally-benign power generation and conversion has sparked

A van der Waals DFT Approach to Modeling Water – Timo Thonhauser Thu. September 24th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this colloquium I will discuss my recent work in electronic-structure theory, which allows us to more accurately study water

Dots for Dummies – Ramamurti Shankar Thu. September 17th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will provide an introduction to quantum dots, a problem where disorder, interactions and finite size combine to make a

When Coal was an Alternative Energy: Engineering, Efficiency, and American Foreign Relations in the Age of Steam – Peter Shulman Thu. September 10th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

This talk examines how American foreign relations and national security between 1840 and 1920 were shaped by developments in geology,

How the CMB challenges cosmology’s standard model – Glenn Starkman Thu. September 3rd, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is our most important source of information about the early universe. Many of its features

LUX, LZ, and the Limits of our Ability to Directly Detect Dark Matter – Tom Shutt Thu. August 27th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Overwhelming cosmological and astrophysical evidence suggests that the dominant mass in the universe is in the form of as-yet-unidentified dark

Making sense of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians – Carl Bender Thu. April 23rd, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The average quantum physicist on the street believes that a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian must be Dirac Hermitian (symmetric under combined matrix

Hunting for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider – Johan Alwall Mon. April 13th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I discuss different types of New Physics scenarios, their motivation and how to see them at the LHC. I give

Higher Temperature Superconductors — Why, Where and How? – Malcolm Beasley Thu. April 9th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

There is a growing realization that the present high temperature superconductors will not lead to electric power applications of superconductivity

Optical Nanotomography of Anisotropic Fluids – C. Rosenblatt Thu. April 2nd, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The physical properties of anisotropic fluids can be manipulated on very short length scales of 100 nm or less by

Cosmology on small scales: the structure of (mostly) dark matter halos [joint colloquium with Astronomy] – Carlos Frenk Thu. March 12th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The standard model of cosmology — the “Lambda cold dark matter” model — is based on the idea that the

Dynamics in the Dark – Andrew Tolley Thu. March 5th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

If Dark Energy is dynamical, it would indicate the existence of new physics beyond the standard model coupled to gravity.

Bent-core nematic liquid crystals: Opportunities and mysteries – Jim Gleeson Thu. February 26th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this talk, we review recent progress with a new class of liquid crystalline materials. These materials, which are based

Atomic-Scale Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Junctions – Georgy Nazin Thu. February 12th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Molecular junctions have attracted a great deal of attention recently due to their importance in the new field of Molecular

Structure and dynamics of non-equilibrium colloidal suspensions – Jacinta Conrad Mon. February 9th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in industrial and technological applications; moreover, the precise control over the interparticle interactions allows such suspensions

Surfaces and Interfaces in Nanoscale Electronic Materials: from Understanding to Engineering – Pengpeng Zhang Mon. February 2nd, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Surfaces and interfaces play a critical role in determining properties and functions of nanomaterials, in many cases simply dominating bulk

The 2008 Science Nobel Prizes – what were they given for? – Tanmay Vachaspati, Jonathan Karn, Piet de Boer Thu. January 29th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this mini-symposium, Tanmay Vachaspati from Physics, and Jonathan Karn and Piet de Boer, from Molecular Biology and Microbiology, will

How Do Physics and Nanotechnology Advance the Research on Renewable Energy? – Zhifeng Ren Tue. January 13th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Physics played an extremely important role in the electronics technology. Now nanotechnology is playing a leading role in the future

Electronics Based on Crystalline Organic Semiconductors – Art Ramirez Thu. January 8th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Organic semiconductors are widely discussed for applications requiring large area and low processing cost. Thin film organics are already used

Seeing and Moving Magnetic Nanoparticles – Sara Majetich Tue. January 6th, 2009
3:30 pm-4:30 pm

Monodomain magnetic nanoparticles act in many ways like giant spins. They differ from bulk magnets because they can move, and

Magnetism in Reduced Dimensions: Exchange Bias (2D) and Myoglobin-based Single-Electron Transistors (0D) – D. Lederman Thu. December 18th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this talk I will outline two major efforts in my lab relating to magnetism: exchange bias, a subject that

Physics of Self-Assembly of Nanoporous Particles: What Defines Their Shape – Igor Sokolov Mon. December 8th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Growth of even simple crystals is a rather hard problem to describe because of the non-equilibrium, kinetic nature of the process.

Shining (some) light on dark matter – Daniel Boyanovsky Thu. December 4th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Most of the matter in the Universe is dark, and is supposed to be SOME particle that interacts very weakly

First Principles Methods for the Design of Materials [joint with Chemistry] – Gerbrand Ceder Thu. November 20th, 2008
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

First principles methods can now be used to predict many properties of materials. Even crystal structure and surface chemistry, long

The Glass Transition and its Relevance for Biological Systems – Alexei Sokolov Thu. November 13th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

For thousands of years people have been using glass transition processes and glasses in their everyday life. For hundreds of

Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life’s Origins – Robert Hazen Thu. November 6th, 2008
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Professor Robert Hazen is a respected and widely published geochemist who studies chemical evolution and the origin of life and

Physics and Baseball: An Intersection of Passions – Alan M. Nathan Thu. October 30th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I have been a physicist for all my professional life. I have been a baseball fan even longer. And in

Complex Interstellar Molecules [joint colloquium with Astronomy] – Eric Herbst Thu. October 16th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In the last thirty years, astronomers have detected a large number of molecules in the gas and solid phases of

Human Detectors: A Scientific Approach to Increasing the Number of Women in Science – Evalyn Gates Mon. October 13th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

What do the search for the mysterious dark matter that pervades the Universe, and the search to understand the underrepresentation

Designing Self-Propelled Polymeric Capsules and Gels – Anna Balazs Thu. October 9th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Using simulation and theory, we demonstrate how nanoparticles can be harnessed to regulate the interaction between two initially stationary microcapsules

Survival of Cooper pairs in the insulating phase: “super-insulators” – Sambandamurthy Ganapathy Thu. October 2nd, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will present experimental results from our study of 2D thin films that are driven through the superconductor-insulator quantum phase

Darwin Celebration Lecture – Judge John E. Jones III Thu. September 25th, 2008
5:00 pm-6:00 pm
CWRU Theory Passes Fermilab Test 30 Years Later – Robert W. Brown Thu. September 18th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The standard model had become everyone’s favorite as the fundamental theory of the world by the mid-1970’s. So, even before

Critical Dipoles and Singular Potentials – David Griffiths Thu. September 11th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Schrodinger equation for a point charge in the field of a stationary electric dipole admits bound states when the

The Search for Special Nuclear Material Using Particle Physics Techniques – David Koltick Thu. September 4th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One of the most devastating attacks a terrorist group could mount would be to detonate an atomic bomb in a

[Entrepreneuship colloquium] The Possibilities Toolbox: Surprising Revelations – Kimberly Wiefling Tue. August 26th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In “The User Illusion” Tor Norretranders notes that there is a significant gulf between perception and reality. Consciousness has a

Precision cosmology for the 21st century – Roberto Trotta Wed. May 7th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The detailed study of cosmic microwave background anisotropies has contributed to transform cosmology into a quantitative, data driven field. Techniques such

Astronomy with Radioactivities [joint colloquium with Astronomy] – Dieter Hartmann Thu. April 24th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The production and distribution of new isotopes is a key topic of the astrophysical theme of chemical evolution. We distinguish

A Neutron Electric Dipole Moment? – Brad Filippone Thu. April 17th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

For more than fifty years physicists have searched for a neutron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) beginning with a search for

Wrinkling, Folding and Crumpling of Thin Sheets – Narayanan Menon Thu. April 10th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Under the action of external forces, thin sheets tend to bend out of plane rather than stretch. For weak forcing,

Rydberg Electron Wave Packets: Observing and Manipulating Electrons within an Atom – Carlos Stroud Thu. April 3rd, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We will review a series of calculations and experiments that my research group has carried out over the past few

The Quantum Mechanics of Global Warming – Brad Marston Thu. March 20th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Quantum mechanics plays a crucial, albeit often overlooked, role in our understanding of the Earth’s climate. In this talk three

Thermodynamics of carrier-mediated magnetism in semiconductors – A. G. Petukhov Thu. March 6th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We propose a model of carrier-mediated ferromagnetism in semiconductors that accounts for the temperature dependence of the carriers. The model

Out of Darkness: The Quest for Lambda – Nemanja Kaloper Fri. February 29th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recent astronomical observations are forcing us to face the cosmological constant problem, which is perhaps the greatest challenge of modern

Quasicrystals in Medieval Islamic Architecture – Peter J. Lu Thu. February 28th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The conventional view holds that girih (geometric star-and-polygon) patterns in medieval Islamic architecture were conceived by their designers as a

When Obsessions Collide: Golf and Physics – Robert Grober Thu. February 21st, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The revolution in low power microelectronics has enabled the development of electronically enabled golf clubs, radically changing the relationship between

Beyond Concordance Cosmology – C. Contaldi Thu. February 14th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Cosmology has well and truly entered its ‘precision era’. The wealth of observations has led to ever tightening constraints on

Metallic Behavior and the Metal-Insulator Transition in Strongly Correlated 2D Holes – Xuan Gao Thu. February 7th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The celebrated scaling theory of localization asserted that all two- dimensional (2D) Fermionic systems are insulators. However, experiments in the

Generalized Nematics: Hints for the GUTS / Electroweak Transition? – Rolfe Petschek Thu. January 31st, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Nematics are materials that have only orientation order, usually described by a non-zero, uniaxial average for a traceless symmetric second

Information Engines and the Second Law – Benjamin Schumacher Thu. January 24th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Maxwell’s demon, which extracts work from a thermodynamic system by acquiring information about it, has for more than a century

Magnetic exchange interactions – Walter Lambrecht Thu. January 17th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this talk I will discuss the origins of magnetic exchange interactions in the underlying electronic structure from a first-principles

Computing the Cosmos: Illuminating the Dark Side with Clusters of Galaxies [joint colloquium with Astronomy] – Gus Evrard Thu. December 13th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Clusters of galaxies emerge at dense peaks in the vast cosmic web of large-scale structure that threads the universe. The

From Jackson Homework to Quality Electrodynamics – Hiroyuki Fujita Thu. December 6th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner design involve an ever-increasing number of receiver channels (32-128), which is required

Breaking News from the Auger Observatory – Corbin Covault Thu. November 29th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The world’s largest cosmic ray observatory has recently reported a new result that represents a major step forward in our

The Cosmic Microwave Background: Cosmology, Topology and Probability – Andrew Jaffe Thu. November 15th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) gives us a glimpse of the Universe as it was only a few hundred thousand

Thu. November 8th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

For a price, it is possible to acquire unearned academic degrees from non-existent universities that market diplomas over the internet.

Chromonic Liquid Crystals – Oleg Lavrentovich Thu. November 1st, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) are formed by molecules with rigid polyaromatic cores and ionic groups at the periphery that

Fundamentals of Supernova Cosmology [joint with Astronomy] – Robert P. Kirshner Thu. October 18th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The use of thermonuclear supernova explosions as standard candles led to the discovery of cosmic acceleration and the search for

Stabilizing Atmospheric CO_2 [joint colloquium with Chemistry] – Gregory H. Rau Thu. October 11th, 2007
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
Energy options [joint colloquium with Chemistry] – John Deutch Thu. October 4th, 2007
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
Science And Science Fiction – Robert Scherrer Thu. September 27th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of “producing” science,

Real-time polarization spectroscopies: applications in thin film growth and photovoltaics – Robert Collins Thu. September 20th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Photovoltaics (PV) technologies based on thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and polycrystalline cadmium telluride (pc-CdTe) have met with

Energy Transport in One-dimensional Systems – Onuttom Narayan Thu. September 13th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In quasi one dimensional systems, the flow of energy has many unusual features. In the first part of this talk,

The Physics Enterprise – C. Rosenblatt Thu. September 6th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A (mostly pictorial) history of how American physics evolved from Ben Franklin’s kite to the tens of billions of dollars

Michelson Postdoctoral Prize lecture – Adam Bolton Wed. May 2nd, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
How to Efficiently Convert Electrical Energy into Light Using Organic Materials – Zakya H. Kafafi Thu. April 26th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

How to Efficiently Convert Electrical Energy into Light Using Organic Materials

Low Temperature Physics and Physicists Six Decades Ago – B. S. Chandrasekhar Thu. April 19th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I shall describe what the field looked like when I entered it as a foot-soldier, i.e. research student, more than

An Explanation for Dayton Miller’s Anomalous “Ether Drift” Result – Tom Roberts Thu. April 12th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In 1933 Dayton Miller published the results of his voluminous observations using his ether drift interferometer, and proclaimed that he

Jamming – Andrea Liu Thu. April 5th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

All around us things seem to get jammed. Before breakfast, coffee grounds and cereal jam as they refuse to flow

Binary black holes and their echoes in the Universe – Pablo Laguna Thu. March 29th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A new window in astronomy will open once gravitational-wave interferometers detect “first light.” These detectors will give us a revolutionary

Plasmons in metallic nanostructures – Peter Nordlander Thu. March 22nd, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The recent observation that certain metallic nanoparticles possess plasmon resonances that depend very sensitively on the shape of the nanostructure

2007 Distinguished Lecture: Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe’s Hidden Dimensions Tue. March 20th, 2007
5:30 pm-6:30 pm
Self-assembled Molecular Nanostructures at Surfaces – Steven Tait Thu. March 1st, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Producing nanometer-scale architectures on surfaces is a current technological and scientific challenge. A natural alternative to current fabrication methods is

Controlled Fabrication and Imaging of Nano-Scale Devices – Douglas Strachan Thu. February 22nd, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Molecular-scale devices hold the potential for a wide range of electronic applications requiring new fundamental scientific understanding.ÊOne of the biggest

The Sensitivity Limits of Nanowire Bio-Sensors – Xuan Gao Wed. February 14th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Nanowire field effect transistors (NWFETs) are emerging as powerful sensors for bio-molecule detection. I will discuss the interplay of device

Optoelectronic devices based on a semiconducting polymer homojunction – Janelle Leger Thu. February 8th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Junctions between p and n type semiconductors are the fundamental structure upon which nearly all semiconductor technology is based. The

Colossal magnetoresistive manganites and high temperature superconductors: so different, yet so similar – Norman Mannella Thu. February 1st, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Transition metal oxides constitute a prototype for complex electron systems in which electrons organize collectively and give raise to spectacular

Bohr’s Vision, Delbruck’s Quest, and the Ironic Origins of Molecular Biology – Neil Greenspan Thu. January 18th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

April 25th, 2003, marked the 50th anniversary of the publication, in Nature (171:737-738, 1953), of the paper by James D.

Surface texture in the A and B phases of superfluid He-3 probed by surface state electrons – Kimitoshi Kono Thu. January 11th, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We performed conductivity measurements of the 2D Wigner solid, which is an triangular array of electrons, on the surface of

Music Theory and Physics – Dmitri Tymoczko Thu. December 7th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I’ll talk about how music theorists encounter structures familiar from physics — symmetry groups, eigenvectors, gravitational fields, even — believe

Dark Energy: Taking Sides on the Issue [Joint Colloquium with Astronomy] – Rocky Kolb Thu. November 30th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

All evidence for dark energy is indirect (as is the evidence for acceleration of the universe). In this colloquium I

Electronic Motion in Molecular Circuits: Elastic Scattering and Beyond – Mark Ratner Thu. November 16th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Current experimental efforts are clarifying quite beautifully the nature of charge transport in so-called molecular junctions, in which a single

Nanoparticle Liquid Crystals as Negative Index Materials – Peter Palffy-Muhoray Thu. November 9th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Light propagation in negative index materials (NIMs) is most unusual: light wave and energy travel in opposite directions. NIMs open

The Cusp at Optimum Doping in the Low-Temperature Hall Number of the High-Temperature Superconductors – Greg Boebinger Wed. October 25th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

After a brief overview of recent achievements at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (MagLab) using our pulsed, powered, and

Pollock’s Paintings: Are They Really Fractal? – Ellen Landau and Kate Jones-Smith Thu. October 19th, 2006
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Ellen:Motivated by a desire to assert the quality of his medium through gesture and materiality, Jackson Pollock’s allover paintings appear

Physics is Fun — Odyssey of a Physics Entrepreneur – Ned Rasor Thu. October 12th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The personal realization that physics is fun and addicting began with a chain of accidental discoveries: discovery of physics as

Dancing Fluids in Controlled Gravity – Charles Rosenblatt Thu. October 5th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Magnetic levitation techniques, whereby a strong magnetic field gradient partially or completely counteracts the Earth’s gravitational force, are applied to

Is the Universe Out of Tune? – Glenn Starkman Thu. September 28th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

It is a widely held view among cosmologists that our standard theory of cosmology — inflationary Lambda Cold Dark Matter

Many worlds in one – Alex Vilenkin Thu. September 21st, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The new worldview that has emerged from recent developments in cosmology suggests that remote parts of the universe are in

“Recycling” Nuclear Power Plant Waste: Technical Difficulties and Proliferation Concerns – Ed Lyman Thu. September 14th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One of the most vexing problems associated with nuclear energy is the inability to find a technically and politically viable

There is plenty of room at the bottom – Norman Tien Thu. September 7th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Richard Feynman gave a classic talk in 1959 envisioning the field of nanotechnology and inviting people to enter a new

Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics: What we have learned and what we would like to discover – Nicole Bell Wed. May 3rd, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Our knowledge of neutrino physics has undergone dramatic improvement in the last few years. We are now in the position

DNA Microtubules: a physical approach to synthetic biology – Deborah Fygenson Thu. April 27th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Microtubules are self-assembling/self-destructing tubular crystals of the protein tubulin that underpin the structure of most cells. Their dramatic dynamic instability

Confinement and Salt-Induced Long-Range Attraction in Colloids – Elshad Allahyarov Thu. April 13th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One of the long-standing problems in colloid science is whether there is like-charge attraction or repulsion between colloid particles in

String Theory and Cosmology – Henry Tye Thu. April 6th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recent advances in string theory leads naturally to an inflationary scenario that can be tested via cosmological observations.

Nematic Elastomers: Liquid Crystals and Fluid Solids – Robert Meyer Thu. March 30th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The combination of a nematic or cholesteric liquid crystal and a crosslinked polymer network, either an elastomer or a gel,

A New Approach to Monte Carlo Methods in Statistical Physics – David Landau Thu. March 23rd, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
The two hydrogen economies – George Crabtree Thu. March 9th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Hydrogen offers a compelling solution to the energy challenges of supply, security, pollution, and climate change. Although today’s technology enables

Green Chemistry – Theory and Practice – Paul Anastas Thu. February 23rd, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Relativity as a General Audience Course: The Inventor’s Paradox and the Explainer’s Paradox – Dan Styer Thu. February 9th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Through a decade of teaching special relativity to general-audience students, I have evolved a teaching strategy that combines numerical, algebraic,

The Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: New Clues from the Pierre Auger Observatory – Corbin Covault Thu. January 26th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays has remained a profoundmystery for decades. Physicists are generally interested in cosmic

Single atom and single molecule manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope – Saw-Wai Hla Thu. January 19th, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The fascinating advances in single atom/molecule manipulations with the scanning-tunneling-microscope (STM)-tip allow scientists to fabricate artificial atomic scale structures, to

Problem Solving and the Use of Math in Physics Courses – Joe Redish Thu. December 1st, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Mathematics is an essential element of physics problem solving, but as professionals, we often fail to appreciate exactly what we

Plasmas as a Prototypical Complex System: Self-Organized Criticality as a Paradigm for Plasma Transport – David Newman Thu. November 17th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In nature there are many systems that exhibit some form of self-organization. Among these are forest fires, earthquakes, sandpiles, maybe

The calculation of electronic excitations in condensed matter – Lorin Benedict Thu. November 3rd, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

For twenty or more years, it has been possible to perform computations of material-specific ground state properties of solids, liquids,

Bending the quantum Hall effect: Novel one-dimensional metallic and insulating states – Matthew Grayson Thu. October 20th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Abstract: One-dimensional conductors are the wires that will connect the circuits of tomorrowÕs nanoworld, so it is important to characterize

Einstein 1905: The Standard of Greatness – John Rigden Thu. October 13th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In the short duration of six months, one week, and two days, Einstein, in 1905, wrote five papers that stand

2005 Robert Cherry Teaching Award Finalist Lecture: A Simple View of MRI and Its Rich View of Us – Robert Brown Thu. October 6th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

With a reported 60 million scans made each year and the frequent news articles on what we are learning about our

The Origins of Microstructure: Dynamics and Patterning of Topological Defects in Soft and Hard Condensed Matter – Robin Selinger Thu. September 29th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Most condensed matter is riddled with defects that interrupt long-range order. Your house key, for instance, contains a network of

A Pocket-Sized Telling of the Genesis of the Greatest Ideas of the Greatest Thinker of All Time OR How Analogy Showed Einstein the Light, and How Light Showed Einstein the Universe – Douglas Hofstadter Thu. September 15th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Call it hubris or call it hubris squared, but somebody had to tackle it in this, the centenary of Albert

High Temperatures Superconductors: Recent Progress and Open Questions – Nandini Trivedi Thu. September 8th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Nanoscience with X-rays – Eric Isaacs Thu. April 21st, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Future nanoscience and nanotechnologies, from quantum computation to light harvesting for energy and advanced medical therapies, will be based on

Order on Curved Surfaces: Scars in Sphereland – Mark Bowick Thu. April 14th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Particles on a flat surface usually pack into a simple triangular lattice. How does this change if curvature is switched

Molecular and Phase Chirality in Polymer Networks – Eugene Terentjev Thu. April 7th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Nature appears to be inherently chiral. From the atomic scale with asymmetric carbon bonds, to much larger length scales like

Precision Results from Lattice QCD – Claude Bernard Thu. March 31st, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

At present the only means of carrying out nonperturbative calculations of the Strong Interactions from first principles is through large

Do Quantum Dots Break Time-reversal Symmetry? – Harsh Mathur Thu. March 17th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Semiconductor quantum dots that contain a few hundred electrons have fascinating electronic properties shaped by the interplay of electron-electron interaction

Transparent Conducting Oxides – Timothy Coutts Thu. March 3rd, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In this talk, I shall begin by presenting some generalities about transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), including work at NREL, their

Searching for dark matter with liquid xenon – Tom Schutt Thu. February 24th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Towards First Glimpses of the Universe in Neutrinos – John Beacom Thu. February 17th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

With the exception of the Sun and Supernova 1987A, no astrophysical sources of neutrinos have been detected yet. However, emerging

Quantum-Limits in Mesoscopic Physics: From Quantum Noise to Qubits and Nanomechanics – Aashish Clerk Thu. February 10th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A number of recent experiments in mesoscopic physics have raised anew the question of what constitutes an “ideal” quantum detector,

Optical Signatures of the Aharonov-Bohm Phase in Carbon Nanotubes – Junichiro Kono Thu. February 3rd, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Single-walled carbon nanotubes, tubular crystals of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are just one atom thick, come in different varieties, each

Connecting the Dark Side and Fundamental Physics – Mark Trodden Thu. January 27th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The universe is composed of normal matter, dark matter and a component that is causing cosmic acceleration. The existence of

Functional and Morphological Imaging of the Human Brain using Magnetic Resonance Imaging – E. Mark Haacke Thu. January 20th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Magnetic resonance imaging is an ever developing area that makes it possible to image the human body in vivo. The

Dynamics of electron-phonon systems – Stuart Trugman Thu. December 9th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We consider the quantum physics of correlated systems, with a focus on electron-phonon coupled systems. The static and dynamic formation

Aerosil Nanoparticles in Liquid Crystals: Order, Disorder, Transitions and lots more – Dan Finotello Thu. December 2nd, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Surfactant and Geometric Effects on Interfacial Stability – David Rumschitzki Thu. November 18th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Ultrafast Dynamics in Complex Materials – Antoinette J. Taylor Mon. November 15th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will discuss the development and application of novel optical spectroscopic techniques to the study of ultrafast dynamics in complex

Prospects for CMB observations – Stephan Meyer Thu. November 11th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation observation is the most important and cleanest probe of the early universe. Currently, most of

Solar photovoltaics – Larry Kazmerski Thu. November 4th, 2004
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Solar photovoltaic (PV) technology has advanced rapidly since the crystalline-silicon solar cell of a half-century ago. Have we arrived at

Putting the Mechanics back into Quantum Mechanics – Keith Schwab Thu. October 21st, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I will discuss our recent experiments where we have made the closest approach to the quantum limit for continuous position

Observation of Superflow in Solid Helium – Moses Chan Thu. October 14th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We report on the observation of non-classical rotational inertia behavior in solid He-4 confined to an annular channel in a

Physics and Society – Bill Fickinger, Cyrus Taylor, and Phil Taylor Thu. October 7th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The three speakers will describe some of the contributions physicists are currently making to the well-being of the nation.

Our energy challenge – Richard Smalley Thu. September 23rd, 2004
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Within the next few decades, we must find an energy source of at least 10 terawatts (TW) of cheap, clean

Ferroelectric liquid crystals: Realities and possibilities – Rolfe Petschek Thu. September 16th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Ferroelectric liquid crystals are of scientific interest and also have a variety of potential applications. I will review the various

Reception to welcome new members of the department Thu. September 9th, 2004
4:30 pm-5:30 pm
The Fourth Decade … and my introductory physics class this fall – Robert Brown Thu. September 2nd, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A lecture given on the occasion of receiving the national 2004 AAPT Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award I describe the

Out of gas: the end of the age of oil – David Goodstein Thu. August 26th, 2004
4:30 pm-5:30 pm

The world will start to run out of cheap, conventionally produced oil soon, possibly within this decade. This talk will

Recent Discoveries in Neutrino Physics – Karsten Heeger Wed. April 28th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of neutrino flavor change in

Organic-Based Magnets: New Materials, New Phenomena, And New Applications – Art Epstein Thu. April 22nd, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Magnets utilizing organic groups with essential spin have been reported since the mid-1980s. Though initial organic-based magnets (OBMs) had magnetic

Revitalizing the Upper-Division Physics Curriculum – Corinne Manogue Thu. April 15th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Paradigms in Physics Program at Oregon State University has totally reformed the entire upper-division curriculum for physics and engineering

Helix-Coil Transition of Worm-like Polymers – Gustavo Carri Thu. April 8th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Many macromolecules like proteins and polypeptides are known to form secondary structures called a-helices at low enough temperatures or under

Physics Education Research: Closing the gap between what we teach and what is learned – Chandralekha Singh Thu. April 1st, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Despite our best and most sincere efforts, there is an alarming disconnect between what we teach and what students learn

Quantum Computers and Decoherence: Exorcising the Demon from the Machine – Daniel Lider Thu. March 18th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recently discovered algorithms indicate that quantum computers may one day enable exponentially faster computation than is fundamentally possible using their

Quenched Disorder in Soft Materials: Helical Polymers and Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers – Jonathan Selinger Mon. March 8th, 2004
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

In statistical mechanics, the term “quenched disorder” refers to heterogeneity that is fixed, unable to respond to changes in a

Causal sets as the deep structure of spacetime – Fay Dowker Thu. February 26th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

One approach to solving the problem of quantum gravity is based on the causal set hypotheis, which states that the

The Full Mottness: Asymptotic Slavery – Philip Phillips Thu. February 12th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Vast progress in theoretical solid state physics has been made by constructing models which mimic the low-energy properties of solids.

Shedding Light on Dark Energy with SNAP – Gregory Tarle Thu. February 5th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Recent experiments have confirmed that the universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, driven by a presently unknown form of

Physics Tricks for Fun and Profit: a Physicist’s Adventures in Theoretical Ecology – Robin Snyder Thu. January 29th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm
The D0 Experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron: Recent Results and Prospects – Mike Hildreth Thu. January 15th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Last summer, the Tevatron experiments released the first physics results based on the substantial quantity of data collected so far

Structural Studies of Alzheimer’s Amyloid Fibrils by NMR: Where’s the Physics? – Rob Tycko Thu. May 9th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Amyloid fibrils are filamentous structures with remarkably similar morphologies formed by a variety of polypeptides with remarkably dissimilar amino acid

Cosmic Inflation and the Arrow of Time – Andreas Albrecht Thu. May 2nd, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Cosmic inflation claims to make the initial conditions of the standard big bang “generic”. But Boltzmann taught us that the

QCD and Natural Philosophy – Frank Wilczek Thu. April 25th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

QCD allows us — indeed, invites us — to address some basic questions from a new perspective, and with much

The Universe’s Unseen Dimensions – Gia Dvali Thu. April 18th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The visible world could lie on a membrane floating in higher-dimensional space. The extra dimensions would explain the weakness of

Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Applied Physics and Electromagnetics – William A. Edelstein Thu. April 11th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the most novel and important medical imaging modality since the advent of the X-ray. MRI

Exciting the Eccentricity of Extrasolar Planets – Re’em Sari Thu. April 4th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The detection of extrasolar planets is one of the great scientific discoveries of the past decade. Most of these planets

Nonlinear Optics, Quantum Optics and Ultrafast Phenomena with X-Rays from Synchrotrons and Free-Electron Lasers – Bernhard Adams Thu. March 28th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In the last few decades, x-ray physics has made tremendous advances, and the development is expected to accelerate with the

Laser-induced phase transformations on a nanoscale – Vladislav Yakovlev Thu. March 14th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Nanotechnology, once a wonderful dream, is now becoming a reality. In order to selectively modify and construct nanodevices we have

New Physics and Cosmology from Extra Dimensions – Nemanja Kaloper Thu. March 7th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Consistent formulations of string theory require the existence of additional spatial dimensions. These extra dimensions can play a crucial role

What’s Kelvin’s Problem? – Randall D. Kamien Thu. February 28th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

We discuss the physics and mathematics of sphere packing and minimal surfaces and use these to explain the crystal symmetries

Getting a Handle on Spintronics with Optical Spin Electrodes – Jay Kikkawa Thu. February 21st, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Spintronics is an emerging field aimed at using the electron’s spin instead of its charge for information processing and computation.

Luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron – Mike Martens Thu. February 7th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The Fermilab Tevatron collides protons with antiprotons to create luminosity at a center of mass energy of 1.96 Tev. This


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