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Upcoming Events

Event Date and Location Summary
Evelyn Hu (Harvard University) Thu. January 24th, 2019
4:00 pm-4:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Defects” as Qubits in SiC: “Inverted Atoms”

There is often a natural assumption that a “perfectly structured” material is required to produce “perfect functioning” of a device, where the function may relate to precision sensing, or the storing or transmission of information. Recently, however, there has been excitement about the performance of defects in crystalline semiconductors such as diamond and SiC. The defects are deviations from perfect, periodic crystalline order, yet can manifest optical emission at a variety of wavelengths, distinctively coupled to long spin coherence times. Rather than focusing on the defect within a semiconductor,

The 2018 Nobel Prizes in Science: What were they given for? Thu. January 31st, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Kathleen Kash (Physics) on the prize in Physics, Gregory Tochtrop (Chemistry) on the prize in Chemistry and Alex Huang (Department of Pediatrics) on the prize in Physiology or Medicine. 

One-half of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Arthur Ashkin, “for the development of optical tweezers and their application to biological systems”. Optical tweezers use the radiation pressure of light to move small particles, and enabled Ashkin to manipulate living cells without damaging them. This work has had major impact in several fields, especially in biology, for example in developing methods to sort healthy from infected or cancerous cells,

Geoffrey Landis (NASA Glenn) Thu. February 7th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

TBA

Ken Singer (CWRU Physics) Thu. February 14th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

TBA

Raman Sundrum (University of Maryland) Thu. February 21st, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Michelle Soares-Santos (Brandeis University) Thu. February 28th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Cosmology in the era of multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves 

Motivated by the exciting prospect of a new wealth of information arising from the first observations of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation from the same astrophysical phenomena, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) has established a search and discovery program for the optical transients associated with LIGO/Virgo events using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). This talk presents the discovery of the optical transient associated with the neutron star merger GW170817 using DECam and discusses its implications for the emerging field of multi-messenger cosmology with gravitational waves and optical data.

No Colloquium. APS March Meeting. Thu. March 7th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
No Colloquium. Spring Break. Thu. March 14th, 2019
1:00 am-1:00 am
at Rockefeller 301
Subir Sachdev (Harvard University) Thu. March 21st, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Ira Rothstein (Carnegie Mellon University) Thu. March 28th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Matthew Fisher (KITP Santa Barbara) Thu. April 4th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Allan MacDonald (U Texas Austin) Thu. April 18th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Moiré pattern physics  in two-dimensional materials

Sinead Griffin (Lawrence Berkeley Lab) Thu. April 25th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301
Bharat Ratra (University of Kansas) Thu. September 5th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm
at Rockefeller 301

Spatial Curvature, Dark Energy Dynamics, Neither, or Both?

Experiments and observations over the two last decades have persuaded cosmologists that (as yet undetected) dark energy is by far the main component of the energy budget of the current universe. I review a few simple dark energy models and compare their predictions to observational data, to derive dark energy model-parameter constraints and to test consistency of different data sets. I conclude with a list of open cosmological questions.

Past Events

Event Date Summary
Colin McLarty (CWRU Philosophy) Thu. January 17th, 2019
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

The two mathematical careers of Emmy Noether

A talk describing Emmy Noether’s life, how she encountered the conservation problem in General Relativity, and how her theorem on it relates to her later larger plan to reorganize all of pure mathematics.


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