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Event Date Summary
Lucile Savary (MIT) — Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecturer Fri. January 27th, 2017
12:45 pm-1:45 pm

Quantum Loop States in Spin-Orbital Models on the Honeycomb and Hyperhoneycomb Lattices

In the quest for quantum spin liquids, the challenges are many: neither is it clear how to look for nor how to describe them, and definitive experimental examples of quantum spin liquids are still missing. …Read more.

Lucile Savary (MIT) – Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecture Thu. January 26th, 2017
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

Quantum Spin Liquids
The search for truly quantum phases of matter is one of the center pieces of modern research in condensed matter physics. Quantum spin liquids are exemplars of such phases. …Read more.

Lucile Savary (MIT) — Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecturer Tue. January 24th, 2017
11:00 am-12:00 pm

Quantum Spin Ice
Recent work has highlighted remarkable effects of classical thermal fluctuations in the dipolar spin ice compounds, such as “artificial magnetostatics.” In this talk, I will address the effects of terms which induce quantum dynamics in a range of models close to the classical spin ice point. …Read more.

Lucile Savary (MIT) — Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lecturer Mon. January 23rd, 2017
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

A New Type of Quantum Criticality in the Pyrochlore Iridates
The search for truly quantum phases of matter is one of the center pieces of modern research in condensed matter physics. …Read more.

Ultra-low field MRI – Michael Hatridge Fri. November 13th, 2015
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), consisting of two Josephson junctions in a closed superconducting loop, are exquisitely sensitive detectors of magnetic flux. In recent years, we have built magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners based around these detectors which are capable of in vivo imaging at ultra-low (132 microTesla) fields, rather than the several Tesla of conventional MRI. …Read more.

Remote entanglement in superconducting quantum information – Michael Hatridge Thu. November 12th, 2015
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

I’ll review material from the technical lectures and discuss the difference between entanglement via local and ‘remote’ interactions. I’ll discuss possible methods for constructing remote entangling measurements in superconducting quantum information and detail our experimental efforts to remotely entangle qubits via simultaneous readout and phase-preserving amplification. …Read more.

Josephson junctions and quantum microwave circuits 2: amplifiers – Michael Hatridge Tue. November 10th, 2015
11:30 am-12:30 pm

Here we will take the concepts from lecture one and set out to construct from the same Josephson junctions very weakly non-linear circuits which operate as phase-preserving amplifiers. I’ll discuss some of the numerous chall enges in designing superconducting amplifiers which are robust and simple while achieving nearly ideal performance. …Read more.

Josephson junctions and quantum microwave circuits 1: qubits and cavities – Michael Hatridge Mon. November 9th, 2015
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In this lecture I’ll review the basics of the Josephson junction and how it is used as the key building block in superconducting quantum information. I’ll show how we build coupled circuits consisting of a rather non-linear oscillator (which we use as our qubit) coupled to an (almost) linear oscillator/cavity which both shelters the qubit from the outside environment and allows for qubit control and quantum-non-demolition readout. …Read more.

Sensing the ripples of time – Amar Vutha Fri. October 17th, 2014
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Almost a century since the dawn of general relativity, we have yet to obtain direct evidence of one of its key predictions: gravitational waves. In this lecture, I will point out how the precisely regular vibrations of atoms in optical atomic clocks can be used to detect the minuscule ripples in time due to gravitational waves. …Read more.

Constraining supersymmetry using molecules – Amar Vutha Thu. October 16th, 2014
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Supersymmetry, and other theories that go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, often predict the existence of new particles and interactions that act as sources of time-reversal violation. These, in turn, induce asymmetries in the charge distribution of electrons. …Read more.

The shape of the electron, and why it matters – Amar Vutha Tue. October 14th, 2014
11:30 am-12:30 pm

The universe, or at least the 5% of it that we understand, is described rather well by the Standard Model of particle physics. Yet even this non-dark sector of the universe conceals a great mystery: // where has all the anti-matter gone? …Read more.

How big is the proton anyway? – Amar Vutha Mon. October 13th, 2014
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

The proton is a bound state of quarks and gluons, described by the low-energy limit of quantum chromodynamics. Recent measurements using muonic hydrogen have, however, called our understanding of proton physics into question. …Read more.

New Possibilities in Transition-metal oxide Heterostructures – Wei-Cheng Lee Fri. November 8th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Heterojunction, the interface between two dissimilar crystalline materials, has been one of ideal platforms for the two-dimensional electronic systems (2DES). Examples include the quantum Hall effect which was first observed in the semiconductor heterostructures. …Read more.

To Superconduct or Not to Superconduct; That is the Question? – Wei-Cheng Lee Thu. November 7th, 2013
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Superconductor, a material losing resistivity below a critical temperature Tc, remains one of the grand challenges in physics. This field began in 1911 with the discovery of superconductivity in mercury at 4.2 K. …Read more.

Novel Collective modes in Unconventional Superconductors – Wei-Cheng Lee Tue. November 5th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Unconventional superconductors are materials whose pairing mechanism is not due to the electron-phonon interaction as proposed by BCS theory. Up to date, known unconventional superconductors all exhibit symmetry-broken phases other than superconductivity in their phase diagrams, and it is widely-believed that the fluctuations associated with these symmetry-broken phases hold the key to the pairing mechanism of unconventional superconductors. …Read more.

Orbital Aspect of Iron-based Superconductivity – Wei-Cheng Lee Mon. November 4th, 2013
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In this talk, I will focus on the new classes of high-temperature superconductors, iron pnictides. While the magnetic interactions are certainly important in these materials, there have been significant evidences suggesting that the orbital degrees of freedom could play an important role as well. …Read more.

Manybody interactions in two-dimensional crystals – Kin Fai Mak Fri. October 19th, 2012
2:30 pm-3:30 pm

The problem of electrons in 2D is one of the most important topics in contemporary condensed matter physics. Coulomb interactions between charge carriers in 2D are dramatically enhanced with the much-reduced dielectric screening compared to their bulk counterpart. …Read more.

Beyond graphene: band insulators and topological insulators – Kin Fai Mak Thu. October 18th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Beyond graphene, there exists a rich family of two-dimensional crystals with a broad spectrum of electronic properties, which remain largely unexplored. For instance, a valley Hall semiconductor emerges by breaking the sublattice symmetry in the honeycomb structure. …Read more.

Optics with Dirac electrons – Kin Fai Mak Tue. October 16th, 2012
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Optical spectroscopy provides an excellent means of understanding the distinctive properties of electrons in the two-dimensional system of graphene. Within the simplest picture, one has a zero-gap semiconductor with direct transitions between the well-known conical bands. …Read more.

Novel two-dimensional systems: graphene and beyond – Kin Fai Mak Mon. October 15th, 2012
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The past few years have witnessed a surge of activities in the study of graphene, a stable sheet comprised of just a single atomic layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice structure. …Read more.

To the GUT Scale – the Majorana Neutrino – Lindley Winslow Fri. May 6th, 2011
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

To connect our current results and those from future reactor and long baseline experiments to the preferred theory for neutrinos at the highest energy scales – a theory which explains tiny neutrino masses and enormous asymmetries of matter versus antimatter in the universe- we need one last ingredient. …Read more.

Colloquium: It’s Chooz Time Folks! – Lindley Winslow Wed. May 4th, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The last decade has seen a revolution in our understanding of the tiniest fundamental particle the neutrino. The results of several experiments have shown that neutrinos oscillate and therefore have mass. …Read more.

Three Neutrino Oscillation – The Missing Pieces – Lindley Winslow Tue. May 3rd, 2011
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Out of the whirlwind of results of the last decade, a new picture is emerging. As we fit together the results, there are several missing pieces. They are the third and smallest mixing angle θ13, the neutrino mass hierarchy, and CP violation in the lepton sector. …Read more.

The Neutrino and Oscillation: A Revolution – Lindley Winslow Mon. May 2nd, 2011
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In the last decade three key experiments KamLAND, SNO, and Super Kamiokande have revolutionized our understanding of the neutrino and have provided the first piece of evidence for physics beyond the standard model. …Read more.

High-Energy Physics with Low-Energy Symmetry Studies – David Hanneke Fri. May 14th, 2010
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Discrete symmetries — charge conjugation (C), parity inversion (P), time reversal (T), and their combinations — provide insight into the structure of our physical theories. Many extensions to the Standard Model predict symmetry violations beyond those already known. …Read more.

Cavity Control in a Single-Electron Quantum Cyclotron: An Improved Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment – David Hanneke Thu. May 13th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Measurements of the electron magnetic moment (the “g-value”) probe the electron’s interaction with the fluctuating vacuum. With a quantum electrodynamics calculation, they provide the most accurate determination of the fine structure constant. …Read more.

Optical Atomic Clocks – David Hanneke Tue. May 11th, 2010
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

The most precise measurement techniques involve time, frequency, or a frequency ratio. For example, for centuries, accurate navigation has relied on precise timekeeping — a trend that continues with today’s global positioning system. …Read more.

Entangled Mechanical Oscillators and a Programmable Quantum Computer: Adventures in Coupling Two-Level Systems to Quantum Harmonic Oscillators – David Hanneke Mon. May 10th, 2010
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The two-level system and the harmonic oscillator are among the simplest analyzed with quantum mechanics, yet they display a rich set of behaviors. Quantum information science is based on manipulating the states of two-level systems, called quantum bits or qubits. …Read more.

Simulation, signatures and backgrounds at the LHC – Johan Alwall Thu. April 16th, 2009
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In the final lecture I will go into details of how to distinguish New Physics at the LHC. I introduce Monte Carlo simulation, the standard tool used for data mining at colliders, and then go on to describe different types of signatures we can expect from new physics, and the Standard Model backgrounds mimicking these signatures. …Read more.

New Physics at the LHC – Johan Alwall Wed. April 15th, 2009
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In this second lecture, I further discuss the problems with the Standard Model and why there should be new physics beyond the Standard Model. I will present different classes of solutions, including Supersymmetry, Little Higgs models, and models for Extra Dimensions, as well as their general signatures at the LHC. …Read more.

Fundamentals of the LHC – Johan Alwall Tue. April 14th, 2009
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In this introductory lecture I will present why we have built the LHC, and discuss the underlying physics of a hadron collider. This includes the fundamentals of QCD (the theory for the strong interaction), features such as jets and hadronization, and an introduction to the physics of the Standard Model, including Electroweak symmetry breaking. …Read more.

Hunting for New Physics at the LHC – Johan Alwall Mon. April 13th, 2009
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

At this colloquium I discuss different types of New Physics scenarios, their motivation and how to see them at the LHC. I give an overview of the difficulties associated with distinguishing New Physics among the backgrounds from the Standard Model, and finally present some best- and worst-case scenarios for the LHC. …Read more.

Astrophysical probes of dark matter – Roberto Trotta Fri. May 9th, 2008
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

The nature and properties of dark matter are one of the outstanding questions in cosmology. A well-motivated cold dark matter candidate is the lightest supersymmetric particle, the neutralino, whose properties however might remain underconstrained even if supersymmetry is discovered at the LHC in the next few years. …Read more.

Precision cosmology for the 21st century – Roberto Trotta Thu. May 8th, 2008
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The detailed study of cosmic microwave background anisotropies has contributed to transform cosmology into a quantitative, data driven field. Techniques such as weak gravitational lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillations have the potential to become new powerhouses of precision cosmology over the next decade, taking cosmology into a new era of exciting discoveries. …Read more.

Probing dark energy with cosmology – Roberto Trotta Tue. May 6th, 2008
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In order to pin down the fundamental nature of dark energy, and thus to understand what most of the Universe is actually made of, new and more precise observations are required, along with more efficient and reliable statistical techniques to interpret those observations correctly and to understand the implications they have for our theoretical models of the Universe. …Read more.

Bayes in the sky – Advanced statistical tools for cosmology – Roberto Trotta Mon. May 5th, 2008
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Increasingly refined cosmological observations, ranging from temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background to the distribution of galaxies in the modern Universe, are leading to the formulation of a “concordance model” of cosmology. …Read more.

Finding and Using Strong Galaxy-Galaxy Lenses in the SDSS – Adam Bolton Fri. May 4th, 2007
11:30 am-12:30 pm

…Read more.

Theory and Phenomenology of Strong Gravitational Lensing – Adam Bolton Thu. May 3rd, 2007
11:30 am-12:30 pm

…Read more.

All I Really Need to Know about Elliptical Galaxies – Adam Bolton Wed. May 2nd, 2007
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

…Read more.

The Modern Practice of Optical Astronomy – Adam Bolton Mon. April 30th, 2007
4:00 pm-5:00 pm

…Read more.

Neutrino Magnetic Moments/ Galactic Positrons and Annihilating Dark Matter – Nicole Bell Fri. May 5th, 2006
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Neutrino Magnetic Moments:
The detection of a neutrino magnetic moment comparable to present limits would be an unequivocal indication of physics beyond the Standard Model. However, the existence of a neutrino magnetic moment implies contributions to the neutrino mass via electroweak radiative corrections. …Read more.

Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics: What we have learned and what we would like to discover – Nicole Bell Wed. May 3rd, 2006
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Our knowledge of neutrino physics has undergone dramatic improvement in the last few years. We are now in the position to make confident predictions taking neutrino oscillations into account, opening the possibility to search for truly exotic particle physics within the neutrino sector, and to use neutrinos as reliable probes of astrophysics and cosmology. …Read more.

Cosmological Neutrinos: Relic Neutrino Abundance and Neutrino Mass Constraints – Nicole Bell Tue. May 2nd, 2006
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Neutrinos play unique roles in many epochs of the Universe’s evolution. Important information can be gleaned from neutrino evolution during the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) era, for example, the best limit on the Universe’s lepton number results from considering BBN constraints together with large angle neutrino mixing. …Read more.

Astrophysical Neutrinos: Revealing Neutrino Properties at the Highest Energies – Nicole Bell Mon. May 1st, 2006
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

High energy neutrino astronomy opens a window on the universe that is not accessible with photons, offering an opportunity to obtain information about both astrophysical sources and fundamental particle physics. Neutrino telescopes, such as IceCube, will have the ability to measure both the energy spectrum and flavor content of high energy neutrino fluxes. …Read more.

Luttinger Liquid and Beyond: Crystallization and Free-Spin Regime in 1D – Yaroslav Tserkovnyak Fri. May 13th, 2005
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

In the final talk of the series, I will discuss some fundamental aspects of the physics of interacting electrons in 1D that go beyond the conventional Luttinger-liquid phenomenology. Strongly- interacting low-density electrons form a Wigner-crystal arrangement on finite length scales. …Read more.

Collective Spin Dynamics in Magnetic Nanostructures – Yaroslav Tserkovnyak Thu. May 12th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Ferromagnetism exhibits exciting novel phenomena when the system size is shrunk to submicron scale. Especially interesting are heterostructures with ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic regions combined in multilayer cake-like structures. I will briefly review the field of mesoscopic magnetoelectronics, where such structures are incorporated in Ohmic circuits, focusing on the scattering- matrix approach. …Read more.

Electron Interference and Correlations as Seen by Momentum-Conserving Tunneling in 1D – Yaroslav Tserkovnyak Tue. May 10th, 2005
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Tunneling between parallel quantum wires of high purity is a powerful tool in investigating electron correlation effects in one dimension. In particular, it turns out that conductance interference patterns due to the finite size of the tunnel junction encode a wealth of information about the dispersion of the elementary excitations in the system as well as the gate confinement of the wires. …Read more.

Spontaneously-Symmetry-Broken Archimedes Screws – Yaroslav Tserkovnyak Mon. May 9th, 2005
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

In the first technical lecture, I will use the tool box developed in treating time-dependent magnetoelectronic problems to consider a more general class of nonequilibrium phenomena in heterostructures with arbitrary spontaneous symmetry breaking. …Read more.

Understanding the Particle Nature of Neutrinos – Karsten Heeger Fri. April 30th, 2004
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Neutrino mass and oscillation have been convincingly demonstrated in the recent atmospheric, solar, and reactor neutrino data. Some of the fundamental neutrino properties, however, are yet unknown. The data do not tell us the absolute mass scale of neutrinos and whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles. …Read more.

Measuring ϴ13 and the Search for Leptonic CP Violation – Karsten Heeger Thu. April 29th, 2004
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Non-accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments have provided strong evidence for the mixing of the three known neutrino states. Precision oscillation studies may hold the clue to understanding the matter- antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. …Read more.

Recent Discoveries in Neutrino Physics – Karsten Heeger Wed. April 28th, 2004
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of neutrino flavor change in solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments to the measurements of neutrino mixing with terrestrial neutrinos, recent experiments have revealed new particle properties of neutrinos and provided the first hint of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. …Read more.

Evidence for Neutrino Oscillation and Massive Neutrinos: The Resolution of the Solar Neutrino Problem at SNO and KamLAND – Karsten Heeger Mon. April 26th, 2004
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Unambiguous evidence for novel neutrino properties has recently been obtained from observations of solar and reactor neutrinos. Combined with previous solar neutrino experiments the results from SNO and KamLAND are evidence for neutrino oscillation. …Read more.

Behind the Scenes with Ultracold Atom Gases and BEC – Brian DeMarco Fri. May 2nd, 2003
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

The field of ultra-cold quantum atom gases began in 1995 with the realization of Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute alkali atom gas. Four years later, in Deborah Jin’s group at JILA, we created the first atomic Fermi gas. …Read more.

Quantum Behavior of an Atomic Fermi Gas – Brian DeMarco Thu. May 1st, 2003
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The colloquium will cover my graduate work on creating the first Fermi gas of atoms. The magnetic trapping and evaporative cooling techniques used to produce atomic Bose-Einstein condensation were extended to create the first quantum degenerate Fermi gas of atoms. …Read more.

An Atomic Turing Machine: Quantum Computing with Trapped Ions at NIST – Brian DeMarco Wed. April 30th, 2003
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

The basic features of quantum information processing using trapped ions will be briefly reviewed from Lecture 1. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. …Read more.

Quantum Information Processing using Atomic and Optical Systems – Brian DeMarco Mon. April 28th, 2003
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Quantum information processing is a rapidly emerging field, with development in atomic, photonic, and condensed matter systems underway. Classical computers (the standard computers of today) are inherently limited by memory storage and computational ability. …Read more.

Beaming and Jets in Gamma Ray Bursts – Re’em Sari Fri. April 5th, 2002
1:30 pm-2:30 pm

Though the distance scale to Gamma Ray Bursts is now known, the energy is still subject to several orders of magnitude uncertainty due to the possible beaming of the emission. Since the flow is relativistic, with Lorentz factor $\Gamma \gg 1$, the emission is collimated to a narrow cone of half opening angle $1/\Gamma$ around the direction of motion. …Read more.

Exciting The Eccentricity of Extrasolar Planets – Re’em Sari Thu. April 4th, 2002
4:15 pm-5:15 pm

The detection of extrasolar planets is one of the great scientific discoveries of the past decade. Most of these planets planets move on orbits with substantial eccentricities. The origin of these large eccentricities is an unsolved puzzle. …Read more.

Theory and Observations of the Afterglow of Gamma Ray Bursts – Re’em Sari Wed. April 3rd, 2002
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Early on 1997, the field of Gamma Ray Bursts had a dramatic breakthrough. The Italian-Dutch satellite, BeppoSAX, delivered accurate positioning of several events. Dozens of ground based and space based observatories monitored the given position, and found decaying emission in x-ray, optical and radio, lasting for years after the events. …Read more.

Phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts – Re’em Sari Tue. April 2nd, 2002
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Gamma Ray Bursts emit 1051-1054erg, mostly in Gamma rays around 1MeV. The short timescale variability (down to a ms) implies a very compact source, and therefore high photon density. With these conditions, the optical depth to electron positron pair creation is huge, in contradiction with the observed non thermal spectrum. …Read more.

The Cosmological Constant and Brane Nucleation – Jonathan Feng Fri. April 20th, 2001
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Present observations favor a small but positive cosmological term. Recent theoretical developments suggest the possibility of fundamental brane degrees of freedom. If these branes are coupled to a three-index gauge field, brane nucleation may neutralize a large cosmological constant, much as pair creation neutralizes an electric field. …Read more.

The Search for Supersymmetry – Jonathan Feng Thu. April 19th, 2001
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Supersymmetry predicts a partner particle for every known particle. I will present some of the theoretical motivations for expecting the discovery of supersymmetry in the near future at colliders, in precision data, and in dark matter searches, drawing on recently reported anomalies as examples. …Read more.

Particle Physics Implications for Dark Matter – Jonathan Feng Tue. April 17th, 2001
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Although the cosmological evidence for dark matter is overwhelming and becoming increasingly precise, the nature of dark matter remains a mystery. Particle physics plays an important role, both by suggesting candidates and by imposing powerful constraints. …Read more.

Focus Point Supersymmetry – Jonathan Feng Mon. April 16th, 2001
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

All of supersymmetry phenomenology suffers from the tension between naturalness and low energy constraints. Most attempts to relieve this tension have assumed that naturalness requires sub-TeV superpartners and have attempted to satisfy the low energy constraints by arranging for scalar degeneracy, In this talk, I will describe an alternative proposal: focus point supersymmetry. …Read more.

Nanofabrication for Fundamental Physics – Keith Schwab Fri. May 12th, 2000
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Researchers are taking advantage of the silicon industry’s development of fabrication tools and techniques to construct devices with dimensions comparable or smaller than fundamental physical length scales, such as the Fermi wavevector, quantum-phase coherence lengths, or the thermal phonon wavelength in a dielectric suspended beam. …Read more.

Measurement of the Universal Quantum of Thermal Conductance – Keith Schwab Thu. May 11th, 2000
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

We have performed experiments to probe directly the thermal conductance of suspended nanostructures with lateral dimensions ~100nm. It has been recently predicted that at low temperatures, thermal conductance in such a structure approaches a universal value of for each massless, ballistic 1D channel, independent of material characteristics. …Read more.

The Josephson Effect in Superfluids – Keith Schwab Tue. May 9th, 2000
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Since the development of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device in the late 1960’s it has been appreciated that similar effects should exist in superfluids. In the past 10 years substantial progress has been made in observing these effects in both superfluid 3He and 4He. …Read more.

SQUID’s and SET’s: Introduction to Quantum Limited Amplifiers and their Application – Keith Schwab Mon. May 8th, 2000
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

The purpose of this lecture is to introduce to the audience the basic ideas of quantum limited amplifiers, SQUIDs and SETs. These devices operate by utilizing fundamental quantum phenomena, which is beautiful and interesting in its own right. …Read more.

Overview: The 2000 Michelson Postdoctoral Prize Lectures – Keith Schwab Mon. May 8th, 2000
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

Condensed matter systems are beginning to display coherent quantum phenomena, behavior that until now had been only the domain of quantum optics. In fact, researchers have recently succeeded in preparing a Single Electron Transistor (SET) into a quantum superposition. …Read more.

Probing the Distant Universe With the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Effect – Joe Mohr Fri. April 9th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Connections Between Galaxy Clusters and Cosmology – Joe Mohr Thu. April 8th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Cluster Regularity as a Tool to Study Cosmology – Joe Mohr Tue. April 6th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Regularity and Complexity: The Dual Nature of Galaxy Clusters – Joe Mohr Mon. April 5th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Quantifying Entanglement – Christopher Fuchs Sat. February 6th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

What Can You Do with Quantum Entanglement? – Christopher Fuchs Fri. February 5th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Sending Classical Information on Noisy Quantum Mechanical Channels – Christopher Fuchs Thu. February 4th, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Optimal Quantum Measurements and the Distinguishability of Quantum States – Christopher Fuchs Tue. February 2nd, 1999
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

A Spectroscopic High Energy Particle Detector and a Search for WIMPS – Thomas Walther Sat. April 18th, 1998
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

Remote Velocity and Temperature Profiling in the Ocean – Thomas Walther Sat. April 18th, 1998
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

A Novel Approach to Testing Bell Inequalities – Thomas Walther Fri. April 17th, 1998
12:30 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.

UV-IR and IR-UV Double Resonance Experiments for the Study of Molecular Dynamics – Thomas Walther Thu. April 16th, 1998
12:45 pm-1:30 pm

…Read more.


Page last modified: August 16, 2016